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BBC on the suffering of cycling
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Jgav




Joined: 06 Dec 2016
Posts: 281

PostPosted: Fri Feb 22, 2019 9:25 am    Post subject: BBC on the suffering of cycling Reply with quote

Fairly well written on the psychology of suffering and cyclists ability to open the pain box. Buried away as usual on the BBC website but thought I'd share. It's right next to the article on Ben Swift current in intensive care after a big crash.

https://www.bbc.co.uk/sport/cycling/47278392
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Jorgan




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Location: alles was ich bin, alles was ich war

PostPosted: Fri Feb 22, 2019 9:28 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

To be fair, most people would rather live vicariously through the travails of Premiership footballers, than read about this stuff.
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mattsurf




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PostPosted: Fri Feb 22, 2019 9:47 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

You don't need to be an elite athlete to push yourself into that zone, I suspect that many of here have similar experiences when training or racing. For me, learning just how far I can push myself is probably the biggest attraction to take part in Triathlons.

Sorry to hear about Ben Swift accident... hasn't he had a pretty poor run of injuries in the past couple of years? I like the statement "he clipped a rock"... how do you clip a rock on a descent? I suspect that he overcooked a corner and the rock was deliberately placed on the verge
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Jorgan




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PostPosted: Fri Feb 22, 2019 10:28 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Having witnessed my wife in labour for nearly 48h, I can tell you that this lot is nothing Smile
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Whisk




Joined: 09 Jun 2005
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PostPosted: Fri Feb 22, 2019 10:47 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

How long before we see people racing with the TCDS headsets? I don't see how they can not ban tech like that from competition
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tommy060289




Joined: 08 Aug 2012
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PostPosted: Fri Feb 22, 2019 12:04 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Quote:
You don't need to be an elite athlete to push yourself into that zone, I suspect that many of here have similar experiences when training or racing. For me, learning just how far I can push myself is probably the biggest attraction to take part in Triathlons.


Can you though? I often wonder if a large component of the best performance is the ability to (and willingness!) to suffer more than others as opposed to simply being 'fitter'
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JaRok2300




Joined: 01 May 2014
Posts: 454
Location: Worcester, UK

PostPosted: Fri Feb 22, 2019 12:51 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I remember watching a program about James Cracknell doing the Marathon de Sables when, despite being horrifically dehydrated and semi-conscious, his only concern was not getting a time penalty for being put on a drip.

If I didn't know already, that made it clear to me that I'll never be much good because, irrespective of genetics etc, I'm just not that bothered.

Now, was he born with that ability/desire or can it be learnt from going that hard many times over years of training/racing? I don't really know, I suspect a bit of both, but I haven't got it. Smile
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mattsurf




Joined: 28 Sep 2016
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PostPosted: Fri Feb 22, 2019 1:10 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

JaRok2300 wrote:
I remember watching a program about James Cracknell doing the Marathon de Sables when, despite being horrifically dehydrated and semi-conscious, his only concern was not getting a time penalty for being put on a drip.

If I didn't know already, that made it clear to me that I'll never be much good because, irrespective of genetics etc, I'm just not that bothered.

Now, was he born with that ability/desire or can it be learnt from going that hard many times over years of training/racing? I don't really know, I suspect a bit of both, but I haven't got it. Smile


My brother rowed for GB U18 squad and trained with the senior squad occasionally. Pinsent, Cracknell, Redgrave and Foster were the best in the world as they had an ability to suffer more than anyone else. Considered in isolation, other teams had better individual rowers, but as a team they were pretty much unbeatable

Apparently some people have a much higher ability to suffer pain, so there is some link to genetics
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Jorgan




Joined: 12 Nov 2007
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PostPosted: Fri Feb 22, 2019 1:25 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

mattsurf wrote:
Apparently some people have a much higher ability to suffer pain, so there is some link to genetics


"no sense, no feeling" Wink
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SGreg




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PostPosted: Fri Feb 22, 2019 1:40 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

The Best place to witness Mind over matter, and the phenomenon of pushing your body beyond what is possible with nothing but will power is simply an Ironman Finish line! Or a Marathon or any long endurance event.

It is staggering how someone can go from running well at a steady pace to being unable to walk, stand or even remain conscious when all that has changed is they have crossed the line.

They were fine before crossing the line but the second they do they lose the desire and the will that was keeping them going (as they have finished) and things can go to #@?# really fast.

It's quite amazing to watch, and even crazier to experience. I did Chester Marathon once and after finishing, got my medal, and attempted to cross the race course to where my car was parked, about 200 meters. I failed and collapsed onto the grass unable to stand for 20mins. 2 Mins Ago I was performing a "sprint" finish!

That's the most extreme but after every ironman/marathon/Ultra I have done in one way or another I have gone from superhuman to a gibbering wreck in the space of 20 seconds. All because I have (rightly) given up.

It's all in the mind
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explorerJC




Joined: 20 Oct 2005
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PostPosted: Fri Feb 22, 2019 2:28 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

i often push through the pain and open that second bottle of red...even when the little voice in my head* is telling me not to....

*Mrs eJC
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TriSam




Joined: 26 Aug 2011
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Location: Tunbridge Wells

PostPosted: Sat Feb 23, 2019 8:35 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

tommy060289 wrote:
Quote:
You don't need to be an elite athlete to push yourself into that zone, I suspect that many of here have similar experiences when training or racing. For me, learning just how far I can push myself is probably the biggest attraction to take part in Triathlons.


Can you though? I often wonder if a large component of the best performance is the ability to (and willingness!) to suffer more than others as opposed to simply being 'fitter'


I completely agree! Last year I really struggled for motiviation in races ot hurt myself, and my times were A LOT slower than my fitness suggested they should have been
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JeffB




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PostPosted: Sat Feb 23, 2019 12:22 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I think that's the difference between Ali B and the rest of the field when he was at or near peak form, he really knew how to suffer in order to win. And probably most other people who won in any sport regularly. That's not to say others weren't suffering, I think he just had an edge.

Didn't Chris Hoy used to fall of the bikes and writhe around in agony for minutes, then get up and do it again?

I did some lab testing about 8-10 years back which included 4k pursuit against a virtual you from a previous race. I reached 16mmol lactic level which the tester said was fairly impressive. At the end I was slumped over the bars gasping and seeing stars. I certainly couldn't do that very often.

As Sam says, if your mind isn't in it, you can fall well short of what your current fitness says you should be capable of.

Jeff
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Jorgan




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PostPosted: Mon Feb 25, 2019 9:43 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

I barely felt any pain when I laid-down a 420w surge coming out of the Embankment tunnel yesterday afternoon (Zwift) to breakaway from my two ride buddies with 1.3km to go. A minute later and I was still hanging-on with around 330w on the clock on the final drag, to put 5s into them at the finish. Zwift...lush init.
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explorerJC




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PostPosted: Mon Feb 25, 2019 2:06 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

JeffB wrote:
I think that's the difference between Ali B and the rest of the field when he was at or near peak form, he really knew how to suffer in order to win. And probably most other people who won in any sport regularly. That's not to say others weren't suffering, I think he just had an edge.

Didn't Chris Hoy used to fall of the bikes and writhe around in agony for minutes, then get up and do it again?

I did some lab testing about 8-10 years back which included 4k pursuit against a virtual you from a previous race. I reached 16mmol lactic level which the tester said was fairly impressive. At the end I was slumped over the bars gasping and seeing stars. I certainly couldn't do that very often.

As Sam says, if your mind isn't in it, you can fall well short of what your current fitness says you should be capable of.

Jeff


getting to 16 mmol/L is no great shakes and is really just an aspect of your physiology...holding 16 would be pretty impressive...
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